Generating a Response from a Burned Out Audience: Is There a Secret Formula?


Respond. Engage. Purchase. The three actions a marketer wants a consumer to take upon seeing their campaign. More often than not, this process, while simple in concept, is among the most difficult to achieve. Why is this?

Consider this: consumers are wary. Subscription fatigue prevails in a world fraught with brands vying for a piece of the consumer’s wallet. In an environment where everyone constantly jostles for position and attention, how is it possible to stand out?

It’s not an easy task, surely. But it’s not impossible. Getting a response from an otherwise burned out market that is only reluctantly tied to technology just requires a bit of creativity — and thinking like a customer.

More Than Sales

One downfall some marketers experience is falling into the “sales” role too often. In this role, the focus is on value proposition, obtaining validation for that value in the form of a customer purchase or sign up.

But don’t forget, there is a whole other side of the product or service marketing lifecycle. Where else can you concentrate resources and energy?

For example, focus on creating a strong, impactful message around the idea of the product or service. What truly prompts consumers to act? When they feel one or both of two things: an emotional connection or a need.

By leveraging both of these response triggers, a marketer can find new ways to reach the target customers, which can lead to a spike in revenue.

Doing Research

When it’s difficult to summon inspiration, just do some research. Look on social media — what are consumers in the target demographic for the brand talking about? What is missing from their everyday lives that could be solved by engaging with or making a purchase from this specific business?

Let’s use an example of an entrepreneur who has launched an online personal shopping boutique. At first, the idea of convenience seemed sufficient to build out a marketing strategy. But then, the business owner saw so much competition for traffic from big names such as Stitch Fix that she found her marketing budget wasted away.

So she began thinking outside the box.

She joined a few Facebook groups dedicated to female workplace fashion. She followed several bloggers and local influencers on social media. She researched the relevant hashtags and added them to her radar. Through this research, she found that the women in her demographic were searching for a more affordable pricing model and more boutique brand items as opposed to big-name designers.

So the online boutique owner tweaked her marketing plan a bit to promote the pricing model (much more competitive than Stitch Fix, even with slightly more limited options) and the fact that she only sourced local and small business backed pieces. Through this savvy marketing refresh, this boutique owner saw her sales begin to flourish. She now has hundreds of monthly subscribers to her service, and the business shows no signs of slowing.

By simply stepping outside of her comfort zone, this entrepreneur was able to make some noise in a crowded space. This is the ultimate goal of the modern marketer.

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